Testimonials

Dr. William A. Pereira

The following is an excerpt from a federally funded study performed by Dr. William A. Pereira in 1995:

Biomechanical Differences in Playing Styles Among Pianists at the Dorothy Taubman Institute of Piano

Cumulative trauma disorders are the number one specific occupational health and safety problem in the United States, according to National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The incidence of occupational CTD's has reached epidemic proportions, currently accounting for over 60% of all reported industrial injuries. CTD's affect workers in a broad range of industries, affecting unskilled laborers and highly-trained professionals alike.

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Leo Gorelkin, M.D.

To Whom It May Concern:

My wife Paula, a classically trained pianist, playing the piano for 53 years, had received cortisone shots about three years ago and eventually surgery on both hands for three fingers from very painful and incapacitating injuries (trigger fingers) which apparently resulted from her playing. After the surgery, yet another finger was threatening. At that time she met a teacher at the Golandsky Institute who suggested she be evaluated by Edna Golandsky herself, a major proponent and master teacher of the Taubman approach. She professed that Edna might be helpful with her problem. What...


Karin Boisvert, M.D.

I am a family doctor in practice in Joliet, a small town near Montreal. I have been playing the piano since the age of five. At the time of writing, I am 28 years old. I participated in piano competitions, but had to stop taking lessons when I entered medical school, although I have continued to play. I started taking lessons again two years ago; I have had more time to play since being in private practice as a doctor.

When I resumed lessons, it was with my childhood teacher. Since the last time I had taken lessons...


H. Franklin Bunn, M.D.

To Whom It May Concern:

I am a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, specializing in diseases of the blood. I am also a keen amateur pianist and study at the School of Continuing Education at the New England Conservatory of Music (NEC). For 5 years I was a member of the Board of Overseers of the NEC. At present I am on the NEC Board of Visitors.

… Because of my other life as an amateur pianist, I am eager for opportunities to learn and improve my playing. More...


Brenda Hunting

I met Therese Milanovic at the first MTAQ workshop she presented on the Taubman Approach five and half years ago. After living with pain and limitation for thirty years due to playing related injuries sustained during tertiary music studies (impacting everyday life and severely limiting my ability to play), I was excited by the glimmer of hope that her workshop offered me. When I embarked upon lessons with Therese soon after that workshop, I had no idea how dramatic the changes would be. Retraining my technique was challenging and at times confronting, but also exciting as each new breakthrough...


Adeline Ee

Being small-built with hands that just about reach an octave, I used to believe that diligent practice would make up for my physical limitations at the keyboard. My teachers in music school concluded that I had weak fingers and poor technique; my arms and body mass were too slight, my bone structure too fine. Virtuosic repertoire, double octaves and big chords were to be avoided at the risk of injury.

So I practiced technical and finger exercises, stretched my hands daily, and continued to labor away at the keyboard. All I got for my efforts was pain:...


Jeremy Chan

My name is Jeremy Chan and I'm from Sydney, Australia.  I started playing the piano when I was 5 and decided to pursue a Bachelor of Music in piano performance at University of South Wales after finishing high school. Prior to this I had won piano competitions, performed on national radio, and had performed all over Australia.

As I was practicing for more competitions, there was a passage in a Stravinsky etude that I found particularly awkward, and I would often feel tired after practicing it.  The feeling of tiredness did not go away, and...


Aaron Jacobs

I first met Edna Golandsky just over two years ago. At the time, I was entering my first year studying jazz piano at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music, but had been struggling with tendonitis in my wrists. Uncertain of what might have caused my injuries and how I could go about getting better, I contacted Edna to see if she could help. I was immediately impressed by Edna's ability to explain and demonstrate the Taubman technique. We began by  examining my technique and getting rid of the inefficient and potentially injurious habits I had...


Hélène Marchand

Val-d’Or, Québec, Canada May 3, 2010 Greetings Ms. Golandsky  I wish to tell you how thrilled we were about the workshop given by Mrs. Mariko Sato at the Val-d’Or Music Conservatory last january, 2010.  I am a piano-accompanist at the music conservatory and 5 years ago, I developed tendonitis in both my forearms. The pain worsened from week to week, and I feared that this condition was the result of my work as an accompanist. I love my work and I couldn’t imagine a situation where I’d no longer be able...


Laura Lucas

Father Sean [Duggan]: I am so grateful that I was able to study with you these past two years. Thank you for your patience, kindness, and understanding. I have grown so much as a pianist and musician. I truly believe God brought me to your studio and allowed me to study Taubman, the adaptation that enabled me to play this recital. I am confident that if it was not for learning the Taubman technique I would not be playing. Thank you for that gift! I look forward to using its insights when teaching students and clients in the future.<...


Dr. Therese Milanovic

My story is a fortunate one.  Upon commencing my undergraduate studies, I was very inspired to improve and to work hard.  With an important exam looming, I increased my practice from two to seven or eight hours a day.  Unaware of the existence of playing-related injury or the severity of the consequences, I played for the exam in pain and was diagnosed later with tendonitis in my right thumb.  Six weeks of no practice seemed like an eternity.  A cortisone injection was presented as the only option, and after the injection I went back...


Charlotte Williams

(From the East Cobber Magazine, Marietta, Georgia)

Starting Over

In 1996, at age 40, pianist/composer Charlotte Williams was faced with two options: she could continue to play piano professionally and endure the ever-increasing pain of tendinitis and carpal tunnel syndrome, or she could set out to find a new career. With over 34 years invested in the study of piano, however, neither option seemed quite right.   “I had reached a real crisis point,” explained Ms. Williams, “because I was literally in pain 24 hours a day.” One evening, during a performance at...