Blog

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Neuroplasticity and Playing the Piano

Dr. Therese Milanovic discusses a part of her doctoral dissertation that deals with brain neuroplasticity and playing the piano. Learn how you can play the piano without injury at our Summer Symposium at Princeton University. Your brain will learn to think differently in order to adapt the Taubman Approach - a body of knowledge that can lead to an effortless and brilliant technique. The Taubman Approach can also prevent and cure fatigue, pain and other playing-related injuries.

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Taubman Approach Benefits All

Many years ago, my grandfather, an Iowa farmer, bought a piano for a dollar at an auction and gave it to my family, because "every child should learn to play the piano."  Little did I know that this was the beginning of a fascinating journey that would span my lifetime. 

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Certified Teacher Shari Weisz on Teaching

Teaching the Taubman Approach is extremely rewarding. I was first introduced to it in 1991, and since studying the Taubman Approach and getting it into my body, it has given me the tools and knowledge necessary to retrain adult pianists to play without pain, with new-found ease and a beautiful tone. It has also enabled me to guide young children in developing a natural technique and give them a lifelong love of music. The gift of this body of knowledge has enriched my playing and is taking me on a very gratifying journey.

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Update from Turkish Workshops on the Taubman Approach

I am in Izmir giving a workshop at the Ahmed Adnan Saygun Art Center.  It's a beautiful and modern facility that opened 7 years ago.  The hall where I am teaching is gorgeous.  The participants have been very enthusiastic and the level of playing quite high.

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After Injury: Journey to Retrain

I was injured during the first semester of my graduate studies at Kent State University in Ohio. I had had mild pain in the past, along with an overall sense of technical limitation that I attributed to a lack of practicing, but this was different. Suddenly, almost overnight, I lost the ability to play even simple scales without pain. When other methods of pain relief proved ineffective (I tried massage, acupuncture, Tiger Balm, IcyHot, Epsom salt soaks, ice, ibuprofen, wrist braces, physical therapy, and examination by other piano technique experts), my professor suggested I attend the Golandsky Institute's Summer Symposium in Princeton. After learning about the Taubman Approach, I decided that the only way I would ever be able to pursue life as a musician would be to retrain. It really was a choice between retraining and giving up piano altogether.