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Over the years, your support of the Golandsky Institute has been greatly appreciated. Your generosity has helped to fund scholarships for students, underwrite concerts and symposia, create the web site and instructional DVDs, increase the number of certification candidates, and move the program forward on many fronts. 

Celebrating a banner year, the Institute brought together the largest number of attendees ever from 17 countries for the Summer Symposium at Princeton University.  Remarkably, over 12,000 people from 58 countries logged on to take advantage of streaming lectures and concerts.  One of the participants said the Symposium was “Better than any other year.  This year every program was inspiring!”

Internationally recognized, the Golandsky Institute has become the premier organization for training in the Taubman Approach. Many students have won local, national and international competitions.  These accomplishments are hallmarks of dedicated teaching and training, augmented by scholarships, concerts, national and international symposia, DVDs, live streaming, and much more. Increased recognition of its impact has resulted in symposia in numerous locations in the United States, as well as Australia, London, Geneva, Montreal, and Poland. The Institute has come a long way. 

In 2018, the Institute will be celebrating its 15th Anniversary. This is an exciting time, but the Institute faces a significant crossroad. In spite of its outstanding achievements, many musicians are not yet aware of the Taubman Approach. Demonstrated and proven, the Taubman methodology is vitally important for addressing technical difficulties, maximizing musicality, and preventing or resolving injuries.   However, getting to where we are has been costly and fund raising has not kept pace with the expansion of the program. As a result, we are facing some difficult decisions. 

To expand and thrive, the Golandsky Institute needs your support.  We must increase its scholarship programs for students and certification trainees to enlarge the pool of knowledgeable teachers significantly.  To communicate the Taubman methodology, the Institute plans to publish more instructional material and explore ways to engage more music teachers. These activities will enable the Institute to reach thousands of teachers and students.  Also critical, the Golandsky Institute must develop a more robust infrastructure. The list is long, but essential to continuing this critical work.

Most important, your generous support is vital to making this vision a reality – bringing the work of the Golandsky Institute to students of all ages and playing levels.  We hope you will consider a special gift to address this exciting challenge.   You may make a tax-deductible contribution to the Golandsky Institue by donating using the form below or sending a check to:

The Golandsky Institute
Park West Finance Station
P.O. Box 20726
New York, NY 10025

Any amount will have an impact on our ability to reach and enrich the lives of musicians who can benefit from our expertise.  We extend our heartfelt thanks and encourage you to join us in this immensely gratifying pursuit!

Sincerely,

Edna Golandsky

Artistic Director, The Golandsky Institute

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“At long last, through the Taubman Approach, I have found the ideal means to near-effortless, directed physical mastery of keyboard technique. Each time that I watch the Taubman Technique videos I discover yet another nuance of this very elegant approach to the correct application of technique to physical and musical performance!”

Stanley G. Rockson, M.D.

Classical and jazz pianists play the same instrument and are governed by the same physiological principles. The physical freedom offered by the Taubman approach is the perfect companion to the creative freedom pursued by improvising jazz pianists.
-Don Glanden, Professor, The University of the Arts